IBAN | Royal Bank of Scotland

IBAN

An internationally agreed method for transactions between banks

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0800 210 0235
Text Relay 18001 0800 210 0235
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Existing customers

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IBANs (International Bank Account Numbers) are used by countries in the European Union, the European Economic Area and Switzerland (plus certain other countries).

Your guide to IBANs

The IBAN identifies the country, financial institution and the individual bank account.

 

Using an IBAN reduces errors and delays in making international payments. An IBAN is always used in conjunction with a BIC (Bank Identifier Code), and is not a new bank account number: it uses existing sort codes and account numbers – but with extra information. Please note that for SEPA payments, only the IBAN is required rather than BIC and IBAN.

 

However, you should never try to create or guess an IBAN. Simply contact the business (or person) you're paying and request their IBAN.


Your own IBAN can be found on your paper statement or on your online statement.

 

When an IBAN is in printed form, the number is split into groups of four characters. This makes it easier to read and check. For example, a UK IBAN in printed form would look like this:

 

GB99 RBOS 1234 5612 3456 78

 

When an IBAN is used to make and receive online payments it should not contain blank spaces or the word "IBAN". So, the above UK IBAN should look like this:

 

GB99RBOS12345612345678

 

Making payments
When you send payments to the EU, EEA, Switzerland and other countries that have adopted the use of the IBAN, you must quote the beneficiary's IBAN and BIC (Bank Identifier Code). Do not give any extra information, such as bank names, addresses or account numbers, as this can cause problems and delay payment. Please note that for SEPA payments, only the IBAN is required rather than BIC and IBAN.

 

Although you have to use IBAN and BIC for cross-border payments, you can also use them to make currency payments within the UK. However, if you're simply making sterling payments within the UK, you should use sort codes and account numbers as usual.

 

Receiving payments
If you receive funds into your account from businesses within the EU, EEA, Switzerland or other IBAN-compliant countries, you must provide the payer with your IBAN and your BIC. Do not provide any account number, bank number or address information, as this could delay your being paid.

 

You can also provide your IBAN and BIC for payments you receive from other countries worldwide, including currency payments within the UK. For sterling payments within the UK, simply use your account number and sort code.
 

BIC (Bank identifier code)

An IBAN is always used in conjunction with a Bank Identifier Code, or BIC. For SEPA payments, only the IBAN is required rather than BIC and IBAN. The BIC is a standard identifier for banks internationally. It is issued by SWIFT and should be used on all international payments. A BIC consists of either 8 or 11 digits. Here is an example of the RBS BIC:

 

RBOSGB2L (8 digits)

or:

RBOSGB2LXXX (11 digits)

You can find out more about BICs on the SWIFT website.
 

IBAN checker

It's important that you check the format of each IBAN before you send a payment. Our IBAN checker can verify the format of an IBAN from a member or joining country of the European Union, the European Economic Area, Switzerland and other countries that have adopted the IBAN.

Use the IBAN checker
 

FAQs

Where can I find my own IBAN?

 

Your own IBAN can be found on your paper statement or on your online statement.

 

What's the purpose of IBAN and BIC?

 

They're a simple way to identify your account and bank details, enabling you to speed up the process of sending or receiving cross-border payments.

 

When should I use my IBAN and BIC?

 

You should print them on your invoices for clients outside the UK. You should also use them when you're instructing a foreign bank to make payments to your account. You can also use your IBAN and BIC for currency payments within the UK. However, for UK payments in sterling, you should continue to use your sort code and account number.

 

Do I have to use my IBAN?

 

Yes.

 

If you want to make a payment to the EU, EEA (including Switzerland) or any of the other countries that have adopted the IBAN, you must use the beneficiary's IBAN and BIC. For SEPA payments, only IBAN is required rather than BIC and IBAN.

 

If you want to receive payment from businesses within the EU, EEA (including Switzerland) or any of the other countries that have adopted the IBAN, then you must print your IBAN and BIC on your invoices.

 

The company I want to pay hasn't given me its IBAN and BIC. What should I do?

 

If you need to make a payment to the EU, EEA (including Switzerland) or any of the other countries that have adopted the IBAN, you must use the beneficiary's IBAN and BIC. For SEPA payments, only IBAN is required rather than BIC and IBAN. By law, the company you're paying should provide this information - they can find this on their statements. The beneficiary's bank can reject your payment if you don't use an IBAN and BIC. If the company hasn't provided their IBAN and BIC, you should ask for these details. You could also tell the beneficiary company that payment may be delayed or subject to additional charges if they fail to provide this information.

 

Should I use my own IBAN and BIC on UK invoices?

 

Most of the time you don't have to include IBAN and BIC information on UK invoices. However, if you're expecting to receive a currency payment from another UK bank account, you can use the IBAN and BIC.

 

Get in touch

 

New customers

To discuss your unique banking needs, please call SolutionsLine on:

0800 210 0235
Text Relay 18001 0800 210 0235
Mon to Fri 8am-5.30pm (excl. public holidays)
Calls may be recorded.

Existing customers

Please contact your relationship manager.

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